Nuclear Science and Techniques

《核技术》(英文版) ISSN 1001-8042 CN 31-1559/TL     2018 Impact factor 0.961

Nuclear Science and Techniques ›› 2019, Vol. 30 ›› Issue (12): 179 doi: 10.1007/s41365-019-0703-2

• NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Impact of atmospheric ionization by delayed radiation from high-altitude nuclear explosions on radio communication

Heng Xu1 • Jian-Ming Ouyang1 • Shang-Wu Wang1 • Yun Liu2 • Xu Sun3   

  1. 1 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
    2 College of Physics and Micro Electronic, Hunan University, Changsha 410006, China
    3 College of Electronics Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, China
  • Received:2018-12-10 Revised:2019-07-28 Accepted:2019-08-10
  • Contact: Jian-Ming Ouyang E-mail:oyjm@nudt.edu.cn
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Heng Xu, Jian-Ming Ouyang, Shang-Wu Wang, Yun Liu, Xu Sun. Impact of atmospheric ionization by delayed radiation from high-altitude nuclear explosions on radio communication.Nuclear Science and Techniques, 2019, 30(12): 179     doi: 10.1007/s41365-019-0703-2

Abstract: In this study, we investigated the motion, shape, and delayed radiation intensity of a radioactive cloud by establishing a volume-source model of delayed radiation after high-altitude nuclear explosions. Then, the spatial distribution of electron number density at different moments on the north side of the explosion point generated by delayed c-rays and delayed b-rays from the radioactive cloud under the influence of the geomagnetic field was calculated by solving chemical reaction kinetics equations. The impact of radio communication in the different frequency bands on the process of atmospheric ionization was also studied. The numerical results of the high-altitude nuclear explosion (120 km high and with a 1 megaton equivalent at 40 N latitude) indicated that the peak of electron number density ionized delayed c-rays is located at a height of approximately 100 km and that of electron number density ionized delayed b-rays is about 90 km high. After 1 min of explosion, the radio communication in the medium frequency (MF) and high-frequency (HF) bands was completely interrupted, and the energy attenuation of the radio wave in the very high-frequency (VHF) band was extremely high. Five minutes later, the VHF radio communication was basically restored, but the energy attenuation in the HF band was still high. After 30 min, the VHF radio communication returned to normal, but its influence on the HF and MF radio communication continued.

Key words: High-altitude nuclear explosions, Delayed radiation, Ionization effect, Radio communication