Nuclear Science and Techniques

《核技术》(英文版) ISSN 1001-8042 CN 31-1559/TL     2019 Impact factor 1.556

Nuclear Science and Techniques ›› 2018, Vol. 29 ›› Issue (2): 25 doi: 10.1007/s41365-018-0365-5

• NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Evaluation of interfacial properties in SiC composites using an improved cohesive element method

Hang Zang, Xing-Qing Cao, Chao-Hui He, Zhi-Sheng Huang, Yong-Hong Li   

  1. School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
  • Contact: Hang Zang E-mail:zanghang@xjtu.edu.cn
  • Supported by:

    This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405124), Science Challenge Project (No. TZ2018004), Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (No. 2015JQ1030), and the Shaanxi Province Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014).

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Hang Zang, Xing-Qing Cao, Chao-Hui He, Zhi-Sheng Huang, Yong-Hong Li. Evaluation of interfacial properties in SiC composites using an improved cohesive element method.Nuclear Science and Techniques, 2018, 29(2): 25     doi: 10.1007/s41365-018-0365-5
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Abstract:

A two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model based on an improved cohesive element method was developed to simulate interfacial debonding, sliding friction, and residual thermal stresses in SiC composites during single-fiber push-out tests to extract the interfacial bond strength and frictional stress. The numerical load–displacement curves agree well with experimental curves, indicating that this cohesive element method can be used for calculating the interfacial properties of SiC composites. The simulation results show that cracks are most likely to occur at the ends of the experimental sample, where the maximum shear stress is observed and that the interfacial shear strength and constant sliding friction stress decrease with an increase in temperature. Moreover, the load required to cause complete interfacial failure increases with the increase in critical shear strength, and the composite materials with higher fiber volume fractions have higher bearing capacities. In addition, the initial failure load increases with an increase in interphase thickness.

Key words: Fiber push-out test, Cohesive element model, SiC composites, Finite element method, Interfacial properties