Nuclear Science and Techniques

《核技术》(英文版) ISSN 1001-8042 CN 31-1559/TL     2019 Impact factor 1.556

Nuclear Science and Techniques ›› 2017, Vol. 28 ›› Issue (4): 45 doi: 10.1007/s41365-017-0198-7

• NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY,RADIOCHEMISTRY,RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Amidoxime-based adsorbents prepared by cografting acrylic acid with acrylonitrile onto HDPE fiber for the recovery of uranium from seawater

Lu Xu1, Jiang-Tao Hu1, Hong-Juan Ma1, Chang-Jian Ling1, Yin-Ning Wang2, Jing-Ye Li1, Guo-Zhong Wu1   

  1. 1 Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China
    2 Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Beijing 100035, China
Lu Xu, Jiang-Tao Hu, Hong-Juan Ma, Chang-Jian Ling, Yin-Ning Wang, Jing-Ye Li, Guo-Zhong Wu. Amidoxime-based adsorbents prepared by cografting acrylic acid with acrylonitrile onto HDPE fiber for the recovery of uranium from seawater.Nuclear Science and Techniques, 2017, 28(4): 45     doi: 10.1007/s41365-017-0198-7

Abstract:

An amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent was prepared by pre-irradiation grafting of acrylonitrile and acrylic acid onto high-density polyethylene fibers using electron beams, followed by amidoximation. Quantitative recovery of uranium was investigated by flow-through experiment using simulated seawater and marine test in natural seawater. The maximum amount of uranium uptake was 2.51 mg/g-ads after 42 days of contact with simulated seawater and 0.13 mg/g-ads for 15 days of contact with natural seawater. A lower uranium uptake in marine test can be attributed to the short adsorption time and the contamination of marine microorganisms and iron. However, the high selectivity toward uranium against vanadium may be beneficial to harvest uranyl ion onto adsorbents and the economic feasibility for recovery of uranium from seawater.

Key words: Radiation-induced grafting, Amidoxime, Acrylonitrile, Uranium, Selectivity