Journal of Radiation Research and Radiation Proces ›› 2018, Vol. 36 ›› Issue (6): 60201-060201.doi: 10.11889/j.1000-3436.2018.rrj.36.060201

• RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIOMEDICINE •     Next Articles

Environmental enrichment improves irradiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

TANG Liyun1, NAI Aitao1, WANG Zhen2, XU Yang3, LIU Zhenghai2, HE Jie4, CHEN Xi2, HE Shuya5, ZHONG Xiaolin6, TANG Yinjuan7, WAN Wei2, AI Xiaohong1, CAO Wenyu2   

  1. 1 Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    2 Clinical Anatomy & Reproductive Medicine Application Institute, Medical College, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    3 Department of Physiology, Medical College, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    4 Department of Pathology, Medical College, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    5 Department of Radiation Medicine, School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    6 Institute of Clinical Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, China;
    7 School of Basic Medicine, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, China
  • Received:2018-08-06 Revised:2018-09-17 Online:2018-12-20 Published:2018-12-21
  • Supported by:

    Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province of China (2018JJ3460, 2018JJ3429, 2018JJ3464, 2018JJ4034), the Education Department Foundation of Hunan Province of China (14A125, 16A187, 16B245, 17B230), Planning Project of Hunan Provincial Health and Family Planning Commission Research Projects (C2016042), The Start-up Funds for PhDs in University of South China (2015XQD27, 2015XQD28), Applied Anatomy and Reproductive Medicine Key Laboratory Construction Project in Hengyang (2017KJ182), and the Science Foundation Project for Postgraduate student of the University of South China in 2018(2018KYZ065, 2018KYZ069)

Abstract:

To investigate the protective effect and potential mechanism of environmental enrichment (EE) on irradiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in mice, thirty-six female Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups administered different treatments:control, Irradiation (IR), and IR+EE. The mice in IR group and IR+EE group were irradiated with 137Cs g rays at an absorbed dose of 4.0 Gy. Mice in the IR+EE group were housed in EE for 35 d following irradiation. The object recognition task was used to evaluate the cognitive function of mice. The expression of the neurogenesis marker doublecortin (DCX), and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) was detected by using immunohistochemical staining. The expression of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and p-CREB proteins in hippocampus was assayed by using western blotting. The results showed that compared with control group, the irradiation group had a low discrimination ratio in the object recognition task (45.55±5.80 vs. 2.99±6.18, p<0.05), had fewer DCX positive cells (123.8±9.3 vs. 70.2±5.9, p<0.05), and had a remarkably lower level of p-CREB/CREB (1.007±0.058 vs. 0.772±0.039, p<0.05). Compared with the IR group, the IR+EE group had an enhanced discrimination ratio (2.99±6.18 vs. 28.31±7.30, p<0.05), more DCX positive cells (70.2±5.9 vs. 95.7±6.5, p<0.05), and up-regulated the expression of p-CREB/CREB (0.772±0.039 vs. 1.014±0.093, p<0.05). The results suggest that EE may alleviate irradiation-induced cognitive dysfunction and impair neurogenesis via enhancing hippocampal p-CREB expression.

Key words: Environmental enrichment, Hippocampus, Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), Cognitive dysfunction, Neurogenesis, Ionizing radiation

CLC Number: 

  • R818.74